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Welding

Postby danielb210 » Sun Apr 02, 2017 4:36 pm

So here is the long and short of it. I'm looking for some guidance and feedback on welding tubes. For the sake of this discussion I specifically talking MIG. I can run a decent bead on straight filets and butt welds. I don't thi k in any way I would pass mustard on the weld profile, but i cant beat them apart with a sledge. I am struggling with doing anything with contour. Going around the filet of a notched tube or the splice in a butt weld I can maybe go 1/2" before I loose track of my path. I stop immediately at which point so I can get back on track. Where I run into trouble is at the stops and starts. Specifically where and how do I start and how do I finish.
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Re: Welding

Postby admin » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:46 am

This looks like we might need to do some video. Let me see what we can come up with. I'll tell you this, what you are attempting to do is one of hte more difficult things to master as the placement of the torch is continually changing. This is more a challenge to keep your hand and wrist moving and relaxed than the actual application of the weld. Do lots of Dry runs (imagine that you are welding the tube withouth actually activating the gun. That little divot at teh end of your weld is from sharply cutting off the current. If you taper off or even do a quick little back weld that won't happen. (Tapering off may not be available on your machine so you'd have to to the whip back. In any case, it will just take practice... You'll get it, just not overnight. But we'll do everything we can to help you understand the process.
Also, wire size is extremely important when doing tubing or any other work like this.. Most guys try .035 thinking it will be 'stronger'.. You'll find that .025"(or similar) wire is easier to manippulate and makes a gerat weld.
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Re: Welding

Postby danielb210 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:13 pm

admin wrote:This looks like we might need to do some video. Let me see what we can come up with. I'll tell you this, what you are attempting to do is one of hte more difficult things to master as the placement of the torch is continually changing. This is more a challenge to keep your hand and wrist moving and relaxed than the actual application of the weld. Do lots of Dry runs (imagine that you are welding the tube withouth actually activating the gun. That little divot at teh end of your weld is from sharply cutting off the current. If you taper off or even do a quick little back weld that won't happen. (Tapering off may not be available on your machine so you'd have to to the whip back. In any case, it will just take practice... You'll get it, just not overnight. But we'll do everything we can to help you understand the process.
Also, wire size is extremely important when doing tubing or any other work like this.. Most guys try .035 thinking it will be 'stronger'.. You'll find that .025"(or similar) wire is easier to manippulate and makes a gerat weld.


I'm using .025. I don't have a tapering option on my machine, but will continue. I do weld every scrap I have just to try to get better. I think I have reading the pool down fair enough to make sure that I have good penetration. The major disadvantage of MIG as you have so aptly stated in the past is you can make a bad weld if you aren't paying a good deal of attention. I think it would probably be easier to learn on larger tube, but all I have at the moment is 1" and smaller.
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Re: Welding

Postby danielb210 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 9:32 pm

Another example, a little more heat and lower wire feed. Need to back up a little further. I'm struggling a bit with vision so I am going to turn down the article dark a little.
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Re: Welding

Postby cad500justin » Tue Apr 04, 2017 12:51 am

I definitely look forward to dads viddy. I consider myself accomplished at mig welding but there's always room for improvement. from your pics, it looks like you could turn the machine down both in current and feed and you'll be able to go slower and work your dimes.
also, I've heard these help even guys with decent vision. (been threatening to try them for tig stuff)
https://www.amazon.com/Welding-Helmet-M ... B00V7UVMV8
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Re: Welding

Postby danielb210 » Tue Apr 04, 2017 9:17 am

cad500justin wrote:I definitely look forward to dads viddy. I consider myself accomplished at mig welding but there's always room for improvement. from your pics, it looks like you could turn the machine down both in current and feed and you'll be able to go slower and work your dimes.
also, I've heard these help even guys with decent vision. (been threatening to try them for tig stuff)
https://www.amazon.com/Welding-Helmet-M ... B00V7UVMV8


Thanks for the feedback Justin. I will have to try the welding helmet reading glasses.
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Re: Welding

Postby admin » Thu Apr 06, 2017 1:52 pm

You know, I forget that some of you kids are just that...kids.. So I didn't consider recommending Cheaters (the magnifying lenses) for your work. As most of the things you'll be doing are 'close up' it may be a big benefit to you to use the magnification. They are inexpensive and you can usually determine a good strength by going to the dollar store and getting a set of reading glasses in the strenght that gives you the best view. Translate that to a cheater and pop it in your lid and you should be all set. I also hope that you are all using electronic lids. PLEASE dont' go "old school" with fixed shade lenses. They are CRAP.. and NO, it doens't mean that you're "Not A Real Weldor" if you use and electronic lens. It means that "YOU HAVE A BRAIN"...
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Re: Welding

Postby danielb210 » Thu Apr 06, 2017 8:17 pm

admin wrote:You know, I forget that some of you kids are just that...kids.. So I didn't consider recommending Cheaters (the magnifying lenses) for your work. As most of the things you'll be doing are 'close up' it may be a big benefit to you to use the magnification. They are inexpensive and you can usually determine a good strength by going to the dollar store and getting a set of reading glasses in the strenght that gives you the best view. Translate that to a cheater and pop it in your lid and you should be all set. I also hope that you are all using electronic lids. PLEASE dont' go "old school" with fixed shade lenses. They are CRAP.. and NO, it doens't mean that you're "Not A Real Weldor" if you use and electronic lens. It means that "YOU HAVE A BRAIN"...


Yes electronic lens. I have a magnifying lense on the way. In the mean time it was suggested that I go from an 11 to a 9 on my settings and turn up the sensitivity. That in itself made a big difference. Started a new project and will share all along the way.
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Re: Welding

Postby admin » Tue Jun 06, 2017 3:43 pm

..."Went from an 11 to a 9..."

Well, that right there should improve you dramatically. Shade 11 is far too dark for mig welding, tig welding etc. You just cant see enough to get 'in the groove".. Now the guys who use 11 all the time will argue, but really, there is rarely a need to go past a 9 shade with the type of welding you're doing. And you'll know immediately if your nor dark enough. You will find yourself squinting and if that's the case, then turn down the shade (up the number).. what you want to see is the weld pool and not much else around it.. If you struggle to see a clear picture of your weld pool (so dark you have to really look ) then it's too dark and you should lighten the screen. Also, for those of you who don't have a set of cheaters/ you CAN use dollar store reading glasses. They fit perfectly on your head and won't interfere with your helmet at all. They do the same thing.. Just perhaps a bit more noticeable when being worn.
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Re: Welding

Postby HardcoreAK » Wed Jun 07, 2017 10:47 pm

I have had the best luck MIG welding with a 10 shade "bronze" lens. But everybodies eyes are different. Some guys have good luck with lighter shades but even after using a auto darkening hood for my tig stuff I LOVE my bronze #10. Anyway, a big part of welding TUBE joints is being comfortable and positioned where you can start and stop within a motion of one position!! I learned to weld Tube Joints on my own with a 110v welder and that taught me to plan better. with a weak 120 amp wire feed (.024-025) It worked best to begin your weld along the edge of the "thickest" or the wall of tube and basically back weld the first 1/2" or 3/4" to get some heat in the joint and a puddle flowing. so Start your weld in a THICK heavy spot and get your welder going and feeding like the shape of a J and then push the bead where it needs to go. Pre-heat helps a bunch, and practice a lot.


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