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Re: Amateur Radio

PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2016 4:07 pm
by admin
I knew we were kindred spirits. MY middle name is Alfred too! :lol:

Re: Amateur Radio

PostPosted: Fri Mar 25, 2016 12:10 am
by cdafoe
Great story Sam, thanks for sharing!!

Re: Amateur Radio

PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 12:08 am
by gordon
What learning method and equipment did you use for learning this skill of taping out morse code. My ancient Uncle back in Scottsville VA used to be heavy into ham radio back in the early60's. I remember as a young Boy Scout participating in several Boy Scout Radio Jamborees (67',68') and communicating with other Scouts as far away as Australia(at that time I was in Winter Park FL). Been looking at used stuff online and checking out various methods of getting this stuff into my brain. I have had a desire to get into it for several years now. Mostly the morse code stuff.

Re: Amateur Radio

PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 8:35 am
by jrfuel
My Dad was into homeland security, before it was called that, in the Navy. Flying the West Coast out of Midway Island looking for the Communist subs and such during the Cold War. He and his buddies used to always win at Spades and other card games by tapping their own morse code signals back and forth. :lol:

Re: Amateur Radio

PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 12:22 pm
by admin
gordon wrote:What learning method and equipment did you use for learning this skill of taping out morse code. My ancient Uncle back in Scottsville VA used to be heavy into ham radio back in the early60's. I remember as a young Boy Scout participating in several Boy Scout Radio Jamborees (67',68') and communicating with other Scouts as far away as Australia(at that time I was in Winter Park FL). Been looking at used stuff online and checking out various methods of getting this stuff into my brain. I have had a desire to get into it for several years now. Mostly the morse code stuff.


I tried a lot of programs but found that the Gordon West Audio and the old AMECO tapes (converted to CD) were the most helpful. I use a device called a Begali CW machine which connects to the computer and a key and puts up a terminal screen so you can check your copy/send proficiency. That was pretty expensive, but the tapes gave me the strong foundation.
There are also apps for the phone that are very good. It's a listening discipline and you need to first get the sounds of the letters down pat. I built my key and then began to 'collect' keys. So far I have about 8 of them but plan to get more because I am mentally ill. :lol:

Re: Amateur Radio

PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 9:06 pm
by gordon
I have been eyeing the keys online, the traditional type and some of the side to side type. Just haven't taken the plunge yet. I an kinda drawn to the vibrotech paddle style for some reason. Not sure if that would be a detriment to the learning curve or not.

Re: Amateur Radio

PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2016 12:43 am
by admin
gordon wrote:I have been eyeing the keys online, the traditional type and some of the side to side type. Just haven't taken the plunge yet. I an kinda drawn to the vibrotech paddle style for some reason. Not sure if that would be a detriment to the learning curve or not.


Do you mean Vibroplex? The make an aboslutely beautiful line of keys. The have a peculiarity to them that isn't present on any other key that I know of. They are also like tuning a nitro motor.. Fairly complex (not really) but with a very distinct tone to them. You can tell if someone is using one when you listen. I wouldn't necessarily sugest on to start out with. They are expensive and again, need to be setup properly (not an overly arduous task, but you want to learn how to send first!).

I have a friend in Colorado (Marshall Emm N1FM )who has a very nice selection of keys (You can look at different manufacturers at his site).both paddles and straight keys. (they are two different styles of sending by the way. One (straight key, you use a single finger, and the Paddles use two fingers. I like both but tend to use paddles unless I'm sending to SKCC members (Straight Key Century Club). They hold a sending 'party' on the first of every month and you can find a frequency from 5WPM to 50 (not for me, I'm a muddler at 15WPM - 20WPM.. I have purchased both a straigh key from him and a paddle (Palm Radio from Germany ) I can post some photos if you'd like. There is another guy in Ukraine who makes awesome and very affordable keys. Check out his site at http://www.ur5cdx.com/index.php?language=en

I bought a beautiful Paddle Key from him sometime ago and it's excellent.

Then there is Begali.. If you want a piece of artwork, they have the stuff. Expensive (too expensive) but really really nice. I own their CW machine which I would recommend to help learn CW (it will teach you the SOUNDS and that's the trick)... http://www.i2rtf.com

Re: Amateur Radio

PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2016 12:45 am
by admin
Just to show you the beauty of the Ukraine keys, here is the Europe 1 key it's awesome. I may have to just buy it!
europe1.jpg

Re: Amateur Radio

PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2016 12:47 am
by admin
I own this one from them:

73_mb_1.jpg


Check out their prices. They are ridiculously low, and they ship very quickly and well packed.

Re: Amateur Radio

PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2016 2:09 pm
by gordon
Thanks for the info. I really like the stuff on the Ukrainian site. The Italian stuff would bite into the racecar budget to much. What is the website for the guy in Colorado, so I can check out his stuff?